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Cuba, Pretty Women and Yumas Manuel Ramos

Cuba, Pretty Women and Yumas

Manuel Ramos

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Kindle Edition
296 pages
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 About the Book 

A Yalie, Manny, not only graduated a year early and magna cum laude, but he won Yales Wrexham Prize for the best senior essay that became the basis for a January 4, 1976 cover story, advocating an end to the ill conceived War on Drugs, in TheMoreA Yalie, Manny, not only graduated a year early and magna cum laude, but he won Yales Wrexham Prize for the best senior essay that became the basis for a January 4, 1976 cover story, advocating an end to the ill conceived War on Drugs, in The Washington Post Sunday Magazine. He is a proud father of four Californian adult children. He was also a La Jolla, California lawyer who sued lawyers for legal malpractice, the professions dirty little secret, a Tulane law professor of ethics, property and legal malpractice, and he even worked for Obama and the FDIC suing lawyers of failed banks. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, Scientific American, the San Diego Reader and the Vanderbilt, Ohio State and University of Florida law reviews. He co-authored a book, Drugs and the Youth Culture. However, when it came time to publish his first two books on Cuba in 2007, this, his first semi-autobiographical novel and a non fiction book, Cuba Emails: My Happy Place, he hit the third rail of not only politics, but publishing. Even though a recent Gallup poll says that almost 40% of Americans have a favorable view of socialism when was the last time you have seen anything positive on Cuba and the Cuban Revolution? Oliver Stone, a fellow Yalie, and one of Americas most successful filmmakers told a Cuban television audience in a 2014 Telesur interview that his career never took such a nosedive as when he did his three documentaries on Fidel Castro. So, here you can finally read two e books by the only Cuban American writer who has actually repatriated to Cuba and arrive at your own conclusions. Manny is currently working on his third e book on Cuba, Cuba Emails: Still My Happy Place that includes all the emails sent to his family and friends from 7/7/07 to the present, and what could not be said in those emails. When Manny first met Yanet, 18, in June 2003 she said she was 22, but she did not lie when she said that she was one of the richest Cubans in Cuba. In a country where Cubans still only make $20 a month, yes, a month, that is not a typo, Yanet was making up to $500 an hour as Havanas most successful jinetera, literally translated as a jockey, a prostitute. Manny had never been with a prostitute, but Yanet looked like a Victoria Secret model and was looking for a way out of her profession. Yes, that is her on the cover. Manny and Yanet are both still amazed that 12 years later they are looking to celebrate their 8th wedding anniversary this year, on 4/2/15. Yanet is now an American citizen, but like Manny, they both prefer to live in their modern fully air conditioned condo they bought two years ago for $25,000 next to the Chinese Embassy in Havanas best neighborhood, Vedado. Anywhere else in the world in a capital city that condo would be worth at least a million dollars. Two years ago Cubans could only buy used rental cars so they bought a modern 2008 Renault SM3 with 100,000 kilometers for $30,000. It is worth $40,000 today because the Cuban government, a year ago, started selling brand new cars to Cubans, but with a $100,000 luxury sales tax. Now, you understand why only 2% of Cubans own a car. Yanet and Manny lived for seven years in Camaguey, Cubas third largest city. Most of the events in these two books takes place in Camaguey and Havana, both UNESCO World Heritage sites. Incredibly, both America and Cuba are neighbors, just 90 miles apart, and so different, bitter enemies for 56 years, even after the historic December 17, 2014 announcement normalizing relations, but, yet, they are more alike than either Cuba or America would care to admit. The Untold History of the United States begins with Oliver Stone looking straight at the camera saying how perturbed he was that his kids were getting the same dishonest view of America he got growing up in New York.